Migrant Exclusion – The Case of Domestic Workers – Keynote Lecture by Rhacel Parreñas and Rachel Silvey

February 22, 2017

Gender, Migration and Contemporary (Im)mobilities
York Centre for Asian Research 2017 lecture series

Migrant Exclusion – The Case of Domestic Workers 
Friday, 3 March 2017 | 2 to 4pm | Room 305, Third Floor, Founders College | York University, Keele Campus 

Most migrant workers confront conditions of non-citizenship, discriminatory policies and exclusionary contexts of reception. This joint keynote will compare the experiences of Filipino and Indonesian domestic workers in the Middle East as they negotiate the conditions of their labour and migration. Dr. Parreñas and Dr. Silvey will discuss their ongoing collaboration that considers patterns of serial labour migration and migrant exclusion – including ineligibility for permanent residency, absence of labour market flexibility and denial of the right to family reunification – mediating the lives of temporary labour migrants in the region.
Speakers: 

Rhacel Salazar Parreñas (Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies, University of Southern California and Fulbright Scholar, Institute on Globalization and the Human Condition (IGHC), McMaster University) has conducted extensive research on labour, gender, migration, and economic sociology. Her current work examines the intersections of human trafficking and labour migration. She has written five monographs, co-edited three anthologies, and published numerous peer reviewed articles. Her latest book is a revised edition of Servants of Globalization (Stanford University Press, 2015). At McMaster she is working on her next book which compares migrant domestic workers in Singapore and the United Arab Emirates, highlighting the vulnerable status of domestic workers in unregulated workspaces.

Rachel Silvey (Associate Professor, Geography and Planning at the University of Toronto and Interim Richard Charles Lee Director of the Asian Institute, Munk School of Global Affairs) is perhaps best known for her research on women’s labour and geographies of gender, inequality and migration in Indonesia. She has published widely on critical development studies, migration and immigration politics, feminist geography and diaspora/transnational studies. Her current work examines Indonesian and Filipino domestic workers’ employment in Singapore and the UAE (US National Science Foundation), and she leads the project on migrant workers’ labour conditions for the SSHRC Partnership Project, “Gender, Migration and the Work of Care: Comparative Perspectives,” led by Professor Ito Peng.

Presented by the York Centre for Asian Research and the Centre for Feminist Research, York University.

All are welcome!

 

http://ycar.apps01.yorku.ca/event/migrant-exclusion-domestic-workers-in-the-middle-east/?instance_id=514


CALL FOR NEW SCHOLARS writing stipend $3000 Gender, Migration and the Work of Care

December 8, 2016

Call for Proposals
Gender, Migration and the Work of Care
A Research Project supported by the
Social Sciences Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)
Center for Global Social Policy, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

New Scholar Associate Program

The Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care project is pleased to announce funding opportunities for new scholars working in areas connected with its foci. The overall project consists of eight interconnected multi-national research initiatives directed toward investigating how the (re-)organization of care is influencing global migration of care workers, and what this means for gender inequalities, social developments, and global governance. These research initiatives examine the social, cultural, and political construction of care; social, economic, and political conditions that are affecting the demand for care and the supply of care workers, and; the living and working conditions of migrant care workers. For information about each project, visit the CGSP website (www.cgsp.ca/resesarch).

We are now accepting applications for New Scholar Associates. The program will provide support to exceptional new scholars conducting research relevant to at least one of the eight subprojects. Up to five applicants will be accepted for 2017-2018. Successful New Scholar Associate applicants will receive a one-time $3,000 writing stipend (to be paid in two installments) to support the advancement and mobilization of their research. They will also have opportunities to work and network with Canadian and international scholars in the field and to gain experience by interacting with policy and NGO community partners. Finally, the program will disseminate their research outcomes to expert and general audiences through various channels such as CGSP workshop presentations and CGSP social media postings and profiles.

Program Responsibilities:

The New Scholar Associates Program offers writing stipends to recent PhD graduates in the social sciences or humanities. The stipends are aimed at supporting the development and completion of academic presentations and publications based on a working paper prepared with the support of the grant. Associates will establish a working paper review committee composed of two to three relevant project leads and/or partners of the Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care project. Six months after the receipt of funds, associates must submit a working paper to their review committee, along with a written report demonstrating that the following outcomes have been achieved:

  • Network connections have been established with leading and/or upcoming researchers and decision makers in the area of gender, migration, and care work
  • A version of the working paper has been submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal or edited collection (status of that submission to be specified).
  • Grantee has made plans to present his/her research (in part or in whole) at a CGSP workshop or conference or another peer-reviewed conference or appropriate venue.

Eligibility:

New Scholar Associates are recent PhD graduates with a promising research profile whose research work enhances knowledge and understanding in at least one of the nine Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care projects.

  • Applicants must have successfully completed their PhD program in the last 3 years
  • Applicants may or may not be working with a project lead or partner of the Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care project
  • Applicants may be from any relevant discipline
  • Applicants may or may not be Canadian citizens, and may or may not be working within Canada
  • Applicants must be conducting part or all of their research on North American, Asian, and/or Asia Pacific countries, their citizens, and/or their migrant workers
  • Applicants may hold a post-doctoral appointment during the program
  • Applicants may not hold an academic faculty position during the program

 

Application:

Applications must include a cover letter; a letter of intent (no longer than two pages describing the relevant research, the working paper that will be completed by the end of the program, and plans for use of funds); a curriculum vitae; and two letters of recommendation, one of which should come from the applicant’s doctoral advisor. Single-file applications and letters must be submitted electronically by email to cgsp@utoronto.ca Letters of recommendation must be emailed directly from referees via their institutional email accounts. Applications will be accepted on an ongoing basis, with winners selected and informed at the beginning of May, September, and January. Only complete applications will be considered for review.

For questions about the program and eligibility, please contact Deanna Pikkov, Interim Research Associate, by email at cgsp@utoronto.ca or by phone at 1-416-978-6351.

 


CALL FOR DOCTORAL ASSOCIATES – research support to $3000 – Gender, Migration and the Work of Care

December 8, 2016

Call for Applications

Gender, Migration and the Work of Care
A Research Project supported by the
Social Sciences Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)
Centre for Global Social Policy, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

Doctoral Associate Program

The Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care project is pleased to announce a research support opportunity for doctoral candidates working in areas connected with its foci. The overall project consists of eight interconnected multi-national research initiatives directed toward investigating how the (re-)organization of care is influencing global migration of care workers, and what this means for gender inequalities, social developments, and global governance. These research initiatives examine the social, cultural, and political construction of care; social, economic, and political conditions that are affecting the demand for care and the supply of care workers, and; the living and working conditions of migrant care workers. For information about each project, visit the CGSP website (www.cgsp.ca/resesarch).

We are now accepting applications for our Doctoral Associates Program. The program will support the work of promising PhD students conducting research relevant to at least one of the eight initiatives of the Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care project. Up to five applicants will be accepted for 2017-18. Successful Doctoral Associates will receive an allowance of up to $3,000 to support their doctoral research work. They will also have opportunities to work and network with Canadian and international scholars in the field and gain experience interacting with policy and NGO community partners. Finally, the project will support Doctoral Associates in disseminating their research outcomes to expert and general audiences through various channels such as CGSP workshop presentations and the CGSP website, social media postings and profiles.

Program Responsibilities:

The Doctoral Associates Program offers a research allowance to a select number of PhD students at the thesis research stage. The fund is aimed at supporting individual research work, including fieldwork, academic travel, research supplies, and other costs directly associated to research. Associates are expected to carry out their research, disseminate their work, and develop useful network ties with key agents and institutions in the field. Associates must provide the following outcomes 12 months after the start of the program:

  • A description of research milestones that were reached
  • Evidence of network connections established with leading and/or upcoming researchers and decision makers in the area of gender, migration, and care work
  • Evidence of presentations and/or in-progress publications from their related research
  • A description of how the $3,000 allowance was used to further their research.
  • A write-up describing their research question, methodological approach, and (preliminary) findings

Eligibility:

Doctoral Associates must be PhD students who are ABD (have successfully defended their dissertation proposal) and whose dissertation work is relevant to at least one of the nine Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care projects.

  • Applicants may or may not be working with a project lead or partner of the Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care project
  • Applicants may be from any relevant discipline
  • Applicants must be enrolled in a recognized university or college
  • Applicants may or may not be a Canadian citizen, and may or may not be working within Canada
  • Applicants must be conducting part or all of their research on North American, Asian, and/or Asian Pacific countries, their citizens, and/or their migrant workers

Application:

Complete applications must include a cover letter; a letter of intent no longer than two pages describing the relevant research, the milestones to be achieved by the end of the program, and plans for use of funds; a curriculum vitae, and; two letters of recommendation (one must be from the applicant’s dissertation committee chair). Single-file applications must be submitted electronically by email to cgsp@utoronto.ca. Letters of recommendation must be emailed directly from the referee using his/her institutional e-mail account. Applications will be accepted on an ongoing basis, with winners selected and informed at the beginning of May, September, and January. Only complete applications will be considered for review.

For questions about the program and eligibility, please contact Deanna Pikkov, Interim Research Associate, by email at cgsp@utoronto.ca or by phone at 1-416-978-6351.

 


Upcoming Publication: Domestic Workers of the World Unite!: A Global Movement for Dignity and Human Rights

December 7, 2016

Project Lead Jennifer Fish’s upcoming book, Domestic Workers of the World Unite!: A Global Movement for Dignity and Human Rights (NYU Press), will be published on July 25, 2017.

Drawing on over a decade’s worth of research, plus interviews with a number of key movement leaders and domestic workers, Fish presents the compelling stories of the pioneering women who, while struggling to fight for rights in their own countries, mobilized transnationally to enact change. The book takes us to Geneva, where domestic workers organized, negotiated, and successfully received the first-ever granting of international standards for care work protections by the United Nations’ International Labour Organization. This landmark victory not only legitimizes the importance of these household laborers’ demands for respect and recognition, but also signals the need to consider human rights as a central component of workers’ rights.

Domestic Workers of the World Unite! chronicles how a group with so few resources could organize and act within the world’s most powerful international structures and give voice to the wider global plight of migrants, women, and informal workers. For anyone with a stake in international human and workers’ rights, this is a critical and inspiring model of civil society organizing.

Jennifer Fish is Chair of the Department of Women’s Studies at Old Dominion University. Her research focuses on women’s labor and migration in the informal economy, with an emphasis on societies in post-conflict transitions and transnational activism.


Newly published: Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea

November 30, 2016

pid_24510Research Collaborator Hae Yeon Choo has recently published her book, Decentering Citizenship: Gender, Labor, and Migrant Rights in South Korea (Stanford University Press, 2016).

Decentering Citizenship follows three groups of Filipina migrants’ struggles to belong in South Korea: factory workers claiming rights as workers, wives of South Korean men claiming rights as mothers, and hostesses at American military clubs who are excluded from claims—unless they claim to be victims of trafficking. Moving beyond laws and policies, Choo examines how rights are enacted, translated, and challenged in daily life and ultimately interrogates the concept of citizenship.

Choo reveals citizenship as a language of social and personal transformation within the pursuit of dignity, security, and mobility. Her vivid ethnography of both migrants and their South Korean advocates illuminates how social inequalities of gender, race, class, and nation operate in defining citizenship. The book argues that citizenship emerges from negotiations about rights and belonging between South Koreans and migrants. As the promise of equal rights and full membership in a polity erodes in the face of global inequalities, this decentering illuminates important contestation at the margins of citizenship.

Hae Yeon Choo is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto. She teaches courses on gender, globalization, and feminist theory and methods. Her current SSHRC-funded project examines the encounter between women refugee claimants and adjudicators at the site of refugee case law in Canada.


Call for papers: The Migration Industry: Facilitators and Brokerage in Asia (deadline: 30 January 2017)

November 30, 2016

Date: 01 Jun 2017 – 02 Jun 2017
Time: 09:30 – 5:30
Venue: Asia Research Institute, Seminar Room
AS8, Level 4, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260
National University of Singapore @ Kent Ridge Campus

The migration industry signals both the privatization of migration infrastructures and the increasingly formalized involvement of brokers and agents in migration. It comes as no surprise that the “migrant-broker” or agent has emerged as an important player to understand the dynamics involved in migrant trajectories. While the work of migrants as informal brokers persists – mainly based on the observation that low-skilled migrants pay a considerable price for their services – it has also been observed that without their involvement migration would often simply not be possible. At the same time, an increasing number of brokers operate within formalized networks and/or as part of professional organizations. As such we argue that an understanding of migrant brokers needs to go beyond kinship ties and clientelism and incorporate an understanding of how such networks and organizations operate within the transnational sphere of migration flows. Our aim is to zoom into mediation processes, institutional practice, and multiple activities of “micro-brokerage” involved in the facilitation of migration as well as the infrastructural support of the migration industry.

We are looking for critically and empirically engaged work in the broadly defined topic of migration brokerage, with a specific focus on the role, knowledge practice, and activities of agents, brokers and other types of facilitators. Papers within the context of Asia or dealing with Asian migrants in other parts of the world are welcome. We invite proposals that explore one or more of the following lines of inquiry:

  • Knowledge Practice: Who are these actors involved in the process of facilitating migration? What types of narratives and rationales influence their practices of knowledge construction and utilization? What forms of knowledge and data become critical to everyday practices of brokering? Is their knowledge of brokerage used instrumentally, symbolically or strategically? How do these actors and institutions engaged in brokerage manage commercial uncertainties of migration recruitment and placement?
  • Bureaucratic and Documentation Regime: How does bureaucratic documentation contribute to specific practices of brokerage within the migration industry? What brokerage artifacts, forms, documents and paperwork account for the increasing commercialization of the mediation process in migration? How are highly specific rules and regulations and their concomitant processes and demands of documentation productive in protecting the rights and safety of migrants? Are there also negative consequences for migrants? And how does the interplay of such demands and associated (social, financial) consequences find itself reproduced in the actual functioning of the industry itself?
  • Socialization and Organizations: If the migration industry is embedded in the commercialization of international migration and through mediation, it is also fundamentally a social process of becoming rather than a state of being or knowing. If so, what does this process look like in practice and what are the consequences for migrants across Asia? What organizations make up the migration industry as a whole? How do organizational approaches to brokering complement, overlap with, and differ from practices that individual and independently operating brokers are engaged in?
  • Mobility and Finance Infrastructure: In order to keep the flow of millions of migrant workers across Asia in motion, a vast and efficient immobile infrastructure is necessary both in receiving and sending countries. The most visible faces of this infrastructure are brokers and agents, but what other businesses are involved in the operation of the large migration industry machinery? What costs do migrants and brokers have to incur in order to make migration possible?

  

SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS

 Submissions should include a title, an abstract of no more than 250 words and a brief biography including name, institutional affiliation, and email contact. Please note that only previously unpublished papers or those not already committed elsewhere can be accepted. By participating in the workshop you agree to participate in the future publication plans of the organizers. The organizers will provide hotel accommodation for three days and a contribution towards airfare for workshop participants.

Please submit your proposal, using the provided proposal template to Ms Valerie Yeo at valerie.yeo@nus.edu.sg by 30 January 2017. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by late February.

 

CONVENORS

Dr Tina Shrestha | aristina@nus.edu.sg
Dr Michiel Baas | arimba@nus.edu.sg
Dr Bernardo Brown | aribeb@nus.edu.sg
Prof Brenda S.A. Yeoh | geoysa@nus.edu.sg

Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore


Newly Published: Nannies, Migration, and Early Childhood Education and Care

November 24, 2016

adamson-cover_nannies-migration-and-ecec

Research Collaborator Elizabeth Adamson has recently published her book, Nannies, migration, and early childhood education and care. 

Once considered the preserve of the wealthy, nanny care has grown in response to changes in the labour market, including the rising number of working mothers with young children and increases in non-standard work patterns.

This book presents new empirical research about in-home childcare in Australia, the United Kingdom and Canada, three countries where governments are pursuing new ways to support in-home childcare through funding, regulation and migration.

The compelling policy story that emerges illustrates the implications of different mechanisms for facilitating in-home childcare – for families and for care workers.

Elizabeth Adamson is an Early Career Scholar and is currently working on an Australian Research Council funded project that is looking at the intersection between employment regulation, care policy and migration policy in Australia, in comparison with Canada and New Zealand.


Call for Papers: 2017 Global Carework Summit (Lowell, MA)

November 15, 2016

June 1-3, 2017
at the Center for Women and Work
University of Massachusetts Lowell
Lowell, MA

The Carework Network is organizing a three-day conference to bring together carework researchers from across disciplines and across the globe.

The Carework Network is an international organization of scholars and advocates who focus on the caring work of individuals, families, communities, paid caregivers, social service agencies and state bureaucracies. Care needs are shifting globally with changing demographics, disability movements, and climate change driven environmental crises.  Our mission is to address critical issues related to carework, such as how identities influence carework; how inequality structures carework; how caring work is recognized and compensated; how state policies influence the distribution of care; working conditions of care; and whether and to what extent, citizens have a right to receive, and a right to provide, care.  Scholars and advocates working on issues related to elder care, child care, health care, social work, education, political theory of care, social reproduction, work/family, disability studies, careworker health and safety, and related issues are encouraged to submit proposals.

The Carework Network welcomes submissions from all academic disciplines, advocacy and non-profit organizations, and public and private sector organizations. We also encourage participation by undergraduate and graduate students. We invite proposals for papers, fully-constituted panels, or workshops.

 Authors and organizers should submit a proposal of their paper, panel, or workshop to carework.network@gmail.com (by e-mail only) no later than December 1, 2016.

  1. Individual paper submissions should include title, names and contact information for author(s), and an abstract of 300 words maximum;
  2. Fully constituted panel proposals should include a general title/theme, contact information for the organizer, and title, author, contact information, and abstract (300 words maximum) for each paper.
  3. Workshop proposals should include a title/theme, 300 word abstract, and names and contact information for all participants.

Decisions regarding acceptances should be made by January 15, 2017, with the program schedule available by the end of February.

In conjunction with this conference New Solutions seeks high quality manuscripts for a special issue dedicated to understanding work environment and occupational health in relationship to paid carework. In practice, this conceptualization of paid care generally includes those who work in the industries of health care, education and child care, mental health, and social services. Authors who wish to have their papers considered for inclusion in this special issue of New Solutions should submit their proposal as detailed above no later than November 1, 2016.  Manuscripts will be accepted until May 1, 2017. Accepted papers will be published February 2018.


Fall 2016 Partner and Project Leads Meeting (Ottawa)

November 5, 2016

Last week, the Human Rights Research and Education Centre hosted a partnership meeting for the members of the Gender, Migration, and Work of Care project. The meeting was an opportunity for the project leads, partners, and collaborators to discuss what they’ve been working on and what more will be done as the project pushes past the halfway mark. (Read more)


Women, Work & Health: Precarious and Invisible Labour

November 3, 2016

womens-xchangeWomen, Work and Health: Precarious and Invisible Labour

*POSTER*  A  panel discussion featuring perspectives from the community, academic and legal sectors

Friday, November 25, 2016
2:30 to 6 p.m.
Women’s College Hospital, Second Floor Conference Centre. Auditorium and Pink Cube
76 Grenville St., Toronto, ON, M5S 1B2

Wi

Dr. Ito Peng, Prof. and Canada Research Chair in Global Social Policy, University of Toronto

Deena Ladd, Co-founder and Coordinator, Workers’ Action Centre

Mary Gellatly, Community Legal Worker, Parkdale Community Legal Services

Dr. Peter Smith, Senior Scientist and Canadian Institute of Health Research Chair, and Assoc. Prof, University of Toronto

Moderator:  Dr. Jennifer Pool, Assoc. Prof. and Graduate Program Director at Ryerson’s School of Social Work