Invitation to submit paper proposal to International Conference: Old Bonds, New Ties: Understanding family transitions in Re-partnerships, Remarriages and Stepfamilies in Asia (19-20 November 2018, Singapore)

May 15, 2018

CFP | Old Bonds, New Ties: Understanding Family Transitions in Re-partnerships, Remarriages and Stepfamilies in Asia
Date:19 Nov 2018 – 20 Nov 2018
Venue:Asia Research Institute, Seminar Room
AS8 Level 4, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260
National University of Singapore @ KRC

CALL FOR PAPERS (EXTENDED DEADLINE: 15 MAY 2018)

The challenges of sustaining an economically productive population amidst declining marriage and fertility rates and an ageing population has seen Asian societies bolstering the institutions of marriage and the family ideologically and nation-states concomitantly implementing a wide variety of family-oriented policies. The dominant emphasis on a decontextualized nuclear family, however, has distorted experiences of alternative family structures and understandings of them, particularly in the case of stepfamilies, which closely resemble conventional first-time families but deal with more complex family transitions such as a prior couple dissolution and re-partnership/remarriage. In public discourses in Asia, traditional values have reinforced the stigma around re-partnering and the dangers associated with it including the abuse of children in stepfamilies. Yet, in other instances, re-partnerships and remarriages are sought as a pragmatic option to overcome dire economic conditions and family instability, and reintegrating into mainstream society. Despite its increasing prevalence, particularly over the last two decades, scholarship on re-partnerships, remarriages and stepfamilies in Asia remains limited and underdeveloped.

Do re-partnerships and remarriages necessarily entail the creation of new kinship ties? Does divorce signal the rupture of family bonds or only the death of a legal relationship? How do the simultaneous existence of ‘old’ bonds and ‘new’ ties in blended families reshape the family? Insights into understanding re-partnerships, remarriages and stepfamilies could on one hand, empirically and conceptually account for shifts in family processes in terms of individual well-being outcomes, intra and extra-familial relationship dynamics as well as inform law, public policy, while on the other, illuminate the relevance of locating these changes within culturally specific contexts of collectivism, communitarianism and familism in Asia. In so doing, it challenges dominant notions of familial relationships as ‘natural’, ‘private’ or ‘universal’ and acknowledge the family as a site of social and political intervention and transformation that engenders social and economic inequality in society. Moreover, it also helps push theorizing beyond a simplistic binary view of family units as either valued resources or deficits. A cross-cultural or cross-national comparison would be vital in understanding differences in remarriage and stepfamily patterns and dynamics not just between Asian and Western contexts but also within Asia where broader social categories including class, race and gender, religion and historicity intersect and (re)produce differentially resourced families and individuals in various national contexts.

This conference welcomes empirical and theoretical discussions using quantitative, qualitative and mixed-methods from multiple disciplines on re-partnership, remarriage and stepfamilies in East Asia, Southeast Asia and South Asia. The following list includes, but does not limit, topics we expect papers to address around these themes:

  • Adult and children well-being outcomes (i.e. physical, cognitive, emotional, educational)
  • Transitions in family processes – changes in familial relationships, caregiving, family roles and family boundaries
  • Socio-cultural attitudes
  • Social support amongst extra-familial institutions and actors
  • Role of the state, laws and public policies
  • Impact of demographic transitions including migration, declining marriage and fertility rates etc.
  • Conceptual and methodological issues: conceptual frameworks and paradigms, multiple sources of data and methodological approaches

SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS

Submissions should include a title, an abstract of no more than 250 words and a brief biography including name, institutional affiliation, and email contact. Please note that only previously unpublished papers or those not already committed elsewhere can be accepted. The organizers plan to publish a special issue with selected papers presented in this conference. By participating in the conference you agree to participate in the future publication plans (special issue/journal) of the organizers. The organizers will provide hotel accommodation for three nights and a contribution towards airfare for accepted paper participants (one author per paper).

Please submit your proposal to Ms Tay Minghua at minghua.tay@nus.edu.sg by 15 May 2018. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out in end May 2018.

CONTACT DETAILS

Conference Convenors

Dr Lavanya Balachandran
Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore
E | arilb@nus.edu.sg

Prof Yeung Wei-Jun Jean
Asia Research Institute, Centre for Family and Population Research, and Department of Sociology, National University of Singapore
E | ariywj@nus.edu.sg

Secretariat

Ms TAY Minghua
Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore
E | minghua.tay@nus.edu.sg

CONTACT PERSON(S)

Minghua TAY


LAST CALL FOR NEW SCHOLARS writing stipend $3000 Gender, Migration and the Work of Care

May 10, 2018

Call for Proposals
Gender, Migration and the Work of Care
A Research Project supported by the
Social Sciences Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)
Center for Global Social Policy, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

New Scholar Associate Program

The Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care project is pleased to announce funding opportunities for new scholars working in areas connected with its foci. The overall project consists of eight interconnected multi-national research initiatives directed toward investigating how the (re-)organization of care is influencing global migration of care workers, and what this means for gender inequalities, social developments, and global governance. These research initiatives examine the social, cultural, and political construction of care; social, economic, and political conditions that are affecting the demand for care and the supply of care workers, and; the living and working conditions of migrant care workers. For information about each project, visit the CGSP website (www.cgsp.ca/resesarch).

We are now accepting applications for New Scholar Associates. The program will provide support to exceptional new scholars conducting research relevant to at least one of the eight subprojects. Up to five applicants will be accepted for 2017-2018. Successful New Scholar Associate applicants will receive a one-time $3,000 writing stipend (to be paid in two installments) to support the advancement and mobilization of their research. They will also have opportunities to work and network with Canadian and international scholars in the field and to gain experience by interacting with policy and NGO community partners. Finally, the program will disseminate their research outcomes to expert and general audiences through various channels such as CGSP workshop presentations and CGSP social media postings and profiles.

Program Responsibilities:

The New Scholar Associates Program offers writing stipends to recent PhD graduates in the social sciences or humanities. The stipends are aimed at supporting the development and completion of academic presentations and publications based on a working paper prepared with the support of the grant. Associates will establish a working paper review committee composed of two to three relevant project leads and/or partners of the Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care project. Six months after the receipt of funds, associates must submit a working paper to their review committee, along with a written report demonstrating that the following outcomes have been achieved:

  • Network connections have been established with leading and/or upcoming researchers and decision makers in the area of gender, migration, and care work
  • A version of the working paper has been submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal or edited collection (status of that submission to be specified).
  • Grantee has made plans to present his/her research (in part or in whole) at a CGSP workshop or conference or another peer-reviewed conference or appropriate venue.

Eligibility:

New Scholar Associates are recent PhD graduates with a promising research profile whose research work enhances knowledge and understanding in at least one of the nine Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care projects.

  • Applicants must have successfully completed their PhD program in the last 3 years
  • Applicants may or may not be working with a project lead or partner of the Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care project
  • Applicants may be from any relevant discipline
  • Applicants may or may not be Canadian citizens, and may or may not be working within Canada
  • Applicants must be conducting part or all of their research on North American, Asian, and/or Asia Pacific countries, their citizens, and/or their migrant workers
  • Applicants may hold a post-doctoral appointment during the program
  • Applicants may not hold an academic faculty position during the program

 

Application:

Applications must include a cover letter; a letter of intent (no longer than two pages describing the relevant research, the working paper that will be completed by the end of the program, and plans for use of funds); a curriculum vitae; and two letters of recommendation, one of which should come from the applicant’s doctoral advisor. Single-file applications and letters must be submitted electronically by email to cgsp@utoronto.ca Letters of recommendation must be emailed directly from referees via their institutional email accounts. Applications will be accepted until May 31, with winners selected and informed by the end of June. Only complete applications will be considered for review.

For questions about the program and eligibility, please contact Deanna Pikkov, Interim Research Associate, by email at cgsp@utoronto.ca or by phone at 1-416-978-6351.

 


LAST CALL FOR DOCTORAL ASSOCIATES – research support to $3000 – Gender, Migration and the Work of Care

May 10, 2018

Call for Applications

Gender, Migration and the Work of Care
A Research Project supported by the
Social Sciences Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)
Centre for Global Social Policy, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

Doctoral Associate Program

The Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care project is pleased to announce a research support opportunity for doctoral candidates working in areas connected with its foci. The overall project consists of eight interconnected multi-national research initiatives directed toward investigating how the (re-)organization of care is influencing global migration of care workers, and what this means for gender inequalities, social developments, and global governance. These research initiatives examine the social, cultural, and political construction of care; social, economic, and political conditions that are affecting the demand for care and the supply of care workers, and; the living and working conditions of migrant care workers. For information about each project, visit the CGSP website (www.cgsp.ca/resesarch).

We are now accepting applications for our Doctoral Associates Program. The program will support the work of promising PhD students conducting research relevant to at least one of the eight initiatives of the Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care project. Up to five applicants will be accepted for 2017-18. Successful Doctoral Associates will receive an allowance of up to $3,000 to support their doctoral research work. They will also have opportunities to work and network with Canadian and international scholars in the field and gain experience interacting with policy and NGO community partners. Finally, the project will support Doctoral Associates in disseminating their research outcomes to expert and general audiences through various channels such as CGSP workshop presentations and the CGSP website, social media postings and profiles.

Program Responsibilities:

The Doctoral Associates Program offers a research allowance to a select number of PhD students at the thesis research stage. The fund is aimed at supporting individual research work, including fieldwork, academic travel, research supplies, and other costs directly associated to research. Associates are expected to carry out their research, disseminate their work, and develop useful network ties with key agents and institutions in the field. Associates must provide the following outcomes 12 months after the start of the program:

  • A description of research milestones that were reached
  • Evidence of network connections established with leading and/or upcoming researchers and decision makers in the area of gender, migration, and care work
  • Evidence of presentations and/or in-progress publications from their related research
  • A description of how the $3,000 allowance was used to further their research.
  • A write-up describing their research question, methodological approach, and (preliminary) findings

Eligibility:

Doctoral Associates must be PhD students who are ABD (have successfully defended their dissertation proposal) and whose dissertation work is relevant to at least one of the nine Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care projects.

  • Applicants may or may not be working with a project lead or partner of the Gender, Migration, and the Work of Care project
  • Applicants may be from any relevant discipline
  • Applicants must be enrolled in a recognized university or college
  • Applicants may or may not be a Canadian citizen, and may or may not be working within Canada
  • Applicants must be conducting part or all of their research on North American, Asian, and/or Asian Pacific countries, their citizens, and/or their migrant workers

Application:

Complete applications must include a cover letter; a letter of intent no longer than two pages describing the relevant research, the milestones to be achieved by the end of the program, and plans for use of funds; a curriculum vitae, and; two letters of recommendation (one must be from the applicant’s dissertation committee chair). Single-file applications must be submitted electronically by email to cgsp@utoronto.ca. Letters of recommendation must be emailed directly from the referee using his/her institutional e-mail account.Applications will be accepted until May 31, with winners selected and informed by the end of June. Only complete applications will be considered for review.

For questions about the program and eligibility, please contact Deanna Pikkov, Interim Research Associate, by email at cgsp@utoronto.ca or by phone at 1-416-978-6351.

 


HOT DOCS FILM FESTIVAL: A WOMAN CAPTURED

May 4, 2018

This film will be shown in Toronto on Saturday, May 5, 2018 

See below for more information

A WOMAN CAPTURED

D: Bernadett Tuza-Ritter | Hungary | 89 min

Marish’s hard life makes her appear much older than her 52 years, and her lined face and sad eyes speak volumes of the life she has endured. For more than 10 years, she has been kept as a slave in a home in a small Hungarian town. Her upper-class captor has abused her, starved her and exploited her as an unpaid housekeeper, and even forces her to work an outside job, only to claim Marish’s full paycheque as her own. Marish’s heart longs to reunite with her 18-year-old daughter, who ran away years ago, but she is too fearful to run away herself. As director Bernadett Tuza-Ritter strategically embeds herself within the home, she never reveals the identity of the captor, but meticulously documents Marish’s plight. Could Tuza-Ritter’s camera and the trust she builds with Marish change the course of events and give her the courage to finally escape? Heather Haynes

For more information, please visit: https://goo.gl/7exVxe

 


APFC – Annual Call for Applications for Post-Graduate Research Scholars

April 9, 2018

Post-Graduate Research Fellowships

The Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada is committed to fostering the next generation of Asia Pacific researchers and analysts. To this end, it offers up to three Post-Graduate Research Fellowships valued at $40,000 for Master’s graduates and $42,000 for PhD graduates for a one-year non-renewable term. Successful applicants will have a background in Asia-related research in a variety of fields, including (but not limited to) social sciences, humanities, business, education, statistics, and natural sciences, and will be based on excellence and fit with the Foundation’s research priorities (energy and the environment; trade and investment; education; and sub-national relations with Asia.) Grants are not intended to support dissertation research.

During their time at the Foundation, Post-Graduate Research Fellows undertake a guided research project with a view to producing a policy paper of 5,000-8,000 words on a mutually-agreed upon topic. They can also take advantage of occasional skills-building workshops offered to staff members at the Foundation.

Post-Graduate Research Fellows are based in the APF’s Vancouver office. In addition to composing a research project, Fellows are expected to participate in the Foundation’s day-to-day activities, including:

• Contributing to the Foundation’s ongoing research projects (which include, but are not limited to, energy and the environment, trade and investment, two-way human capital flows and provincial-level engagement of Asia);

• Assisting in the composition and distribution of the daily Canada-Asia news service;

• Providing assistance in hosting roundtables, conferences and meetings both in-house and off-site;

• Participating in and contributing to APF Canada Research Group meetings, as well as other meetings and activities in the Canadian and Asian policy communities; and

• Assisting with other on-going Foundation research.

For questions, or to speak with a current Post-Graduate Research Fellow, please contact Serena Ko at serena.ko@asiapacific.ca

Eligibility
Canadian citizens and permanent residents who have graduated from a Master’s or doctoral program within 18 months of the application (as defined by the date of the graduation ceremony) are eligible to apply.

Successful applicants receive $40,000 for Master’s graduates and $42,000 for PhD graduates for a one-year non-renewable term. A relocation amount of up to $1,000 will be given to cover the moving expenses for out-of-town recipients.

Travel Allowance
Post-Graduate Research Fellows can request some funding support for travel related to their activities at the Foundation. This includes travel for conferences, workshops or research programs. These requests will be approved on a case-by-case basis.

Additional Travel Funds – The Yuen Pau Woo Travel Award
Established in 2015 through a donation from former Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada President, Senator Yuen Pau Woo, the Yuen Pau Woo Travel Award is awarded annually in the amount of up to $2,000 to one or more outstanding Post-Graduate Research Fellows.

The Award is intended to supplement the Foundation’s Post-Graduate Research Fellowship program, and supports travel related to research, fieldwork, conferences and other initiatives undertaken by Post-Graduate Research Fellows.

To contribute to the Yuen Pau Woo Travel Award fund, click here.

Start/End Dates
Fellowships run for 12 months and normally begin between July and September. In special circumstances, Fellows will be able to start at a later date.

Disbursement of Funds 
Payments will be made to the recipient in quarterly installments.

Application Procedures
Applications should include:

•A cover letter and résumé detailing the applicant’s academic background;

• A writing sample (published or unpublished);

• A 500-750 word description of the project that would be undertaken at the Foundation.

• Two letters of recommendation from individuals who know the applicant. If sending hard copies, referees should mail them directly to the Foundation at the address below. If sending by email, the letter should be in the form of a signed PDF document, sent from the referee’s institutional (e.g., university) email address.

Application Deadline
The 2018-2019 award year will begin receiving applications February 1st, 2018 and will close April 30th, 2018. All application documents, including both letters of recommendation, must be received by this date. Short-listed candidates will be contacted for interviews, and successful applicants will be notified in May.

Where to Apply
Applications and questions may be emailed to: serena.ko@asiapacific.ca (subject headline must indicate “PGRF 2018-2019 Application”) or mailed to:

Serena Ko – Research Grants Program
Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada
900-675 West Hastings St.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6B 1N2

Applications are accepted in English and French.

*The Foundation reserves the right to cite the results of research funded under the grants program, and grant recipients may be called upon for media and outreach activities coordinated by the Foundation.

http://www.asiapacific.ca/grants/post-graduate-research-fellowships

 


What is the migrant sense of place? Reflections on urban diversity & encounters from Singapore

April 5, 2018

Invitation – Lecture by Prof. Junjia Ye, April 9, 2018 | 2–4PM

DESCRIPTION

Abstract:
The growing “diversity-turn” in the social scientific study of migrant-led urban change is an exciting opportunity for geographers. While much has been said about encounters with difference and diversity in public spaces, there has been a silence on the very nature of incorporation within these spatial negotiations and transformations. While Stuart Hall is right in pointing out how the “capacity to live with difference” is one of the key questions of the 21st Century (1993: 361), many Asian urban contexts demonstrate that co-existing and managing difference have always been a fundamental dimension of historical reality. Urban diversification in this part of the world is led largely by carefully calibrated labour migration. Drawing upon ethnographic data collected through mixed methodology in Singapore, this paper both reflects and questions existing literature on urban diversity and coexistence. I examine the spatial and political implications of migrant incorporation by identifying two key strands of geographical imaginations in these two growing fields. The paper, thus, has two objectives. First, to retain critical analytical purchase on what living with difference in shared spaces specifically through “incorporation” means at both the governmental and everyday levels. Measures of inclusion can carry out the political work of management that can structure what form belonging takes and, consequently, stratify who belongs and who does not. Rather than being intriniscally open or opposed to exclusion, the aggregate processes of “incorporation” alluded to above render people subject to particular imaginaries of diversity. The second objective of this paper is to outline the agenda for future research. There needs to be the prompt address of the impact of structural differentiation on the spatial practices of migrants in diversifying contexts and the nature of diversifying spaces themselves. What, indeed, is the migrant sense of place?

Bio:
Dr Junjia Ye is an Assistant Professor in Human Geography at Nanyang Technological University who completed her PhD in Geography at the University of British Columbia. Her research interests lie at the intersections of cultural diversity, critical cosmopolitanism, class, gender studies and the political-economic development of urban Southeast Asia. Alongside extensive ethnographic research methods, she also uses techniques of film and photography to create visual narratives through her work. The fundamental question that underlies her research is what accounts for how social and economic differences are constituted through people’s mobilities to, through and from diversifying cities? Her recent work has been published in Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, Annals of the American Association of Geographers and Environment and Planning D: Society and Space. Her first monograph entitled Class inequality in the global city: migrants, workers and cosmopolitanism in Singapore (2016, Palgrave Macmillan) won Labour History’s annual book prize.

Contact

Mayumi Yamaguchi
416-946-8996


Speakers

Dr.Junjia Ye
Assistant Professor of Human Geography, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore


Main Sponsor

Asian Institute

Co-Sponsors

York Centre for Asian Research, Department of Geography York University

Graduate Program in Geography York University


If you are attending a Munk School event and require accommodation(s), please email the event contact listed above to make appropriate arrangements.


A Joint Symposium on Global Health and Care

March 12, 2018

A Joint Symposium on Global Health and Care

Cosponsored by RC19 and RC15, the Centre for Global Social Policy, and the Department of Sociology, U of T

July 13-14, 2018  University of Toronto

Thinking globally about health, care work and related social policy requires a shift in sociological thinking. This symposium asks what sociology has to offer to the study of global health and care, including what it has already contributed, what it might yet contribute, and what might be gained from a more systematic or programmatic consideration of “the global.”

The symposium will take place on the afternoon and early evening of July 13th and the full day of July 14th, which is the day before the commencement of International Sociological Association meetings in Toronto. The schedule for the symposium can be found here.


In working towards a specification of the global to guide this symposium, we began with a list of criteria that we think are individually insufficient, but might be adequate in combination:

  1. comparative (across nations, regions, cultures);
  2. inclusive of understudied people and places;
  3. descriptive of global trends;
  4. attentive to global institutions and to local movements with global aspirations;
  5. feature theoretical approaches that specify macro-micro links within the context of macro-level political-economic theory (e.g. World systems).

There will also be sessions on forthcoming books.

Registration for the symposium can be found here. The enrolment password is “July14”

For more information, please contact william.magee@utoronto.ca


Additionally sponsored by:

Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council of Canada
Scott Schieman, Canada Research Chair in the Social Context of Health, Chair of Department of Sociology (St. George)
Ito Peng, Canada Research Chair in Global Social Policy, Director of Centre for Global Social Policy

Organizational Committee:

William Magee; Markus Schafer; Deanna Pikkov; Adriana Kiatipis; Sherri Klassen; Joe Harris; Erica De Ruggiero; Monica Casper


Upcoming events in March and April featuring Sohoon Lee and Cynthia Cranford

March 5, 2018

Upcoming Events in March and April

1. Community Screening of Variety Survival Talkshow: more information and free tickets here.
https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/community-screening-of-variety-survival-talkshow-conversations-with-the-director-jo-se-young-and-tickets-42895669101

2. Feminist Seminar: March 21, 2018 (Wed) 2-4pm; Room 240 (Soc Dept, 725 Spadina) (co-sponsored with Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration Workshop)

Author: Sarah Shah (PhD student, U of Toronto)

Title: Great Expectations? Contextualizing Mental Health Outcomes of Intimate Partner Violence

Discussant: Cynthia Cranford (U of Toronto)

Abstract. Extant research indicates that women from more gender equitable countries enjoy higher levels of mental health than women from less equitable backgrounds. However, research also indicates that when women are confronted with unfair gendered interactions, they experience poor mental health outcomes. Whether women’s country of origin can shape mental health outcomes following experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) is, therefore, quite a perplexing puzzle. Does gender inequality of the country of origin affect the association between intimate partner violence and mental health outcomes among immigrant Canadian women? Is this relationship mediated or moderated by personal and social resources? This study is innovative in four distinct ways: first, it includes measures previously unused in IPV literature, including the Gender Inequality Index (GII) by year of immigration for country of origin, as well as levels of anger of the respondent and perceptions of mastery over the environment; second, it applies a hierarchal approach to analyzing the experiences of women as situated within social structures; third, it analyzes social and personal resources as well as country of origin in relation to outcomes following experiences of IPV, instead of analyzing IPV as an outcome; and finally, it uses primary data from a sample of Toronto women. Drawing on the stress process model and nested ecological framework theory, this study implements multilevel model techniques on the Neighborhood Effects on Health and Well-being (NEHW 2010) Study. Findings include that higher levels of gender equality correlated with higher rates of poor mental health following experiences of IPV, and that this relationship is mediated and buffered by mastery and social support, respectively. While I offer potential explanation for these findings using expectation states theory, I stress the actual mechanisms for these relationships remain are unknown. I conclude by discussing both the limitations of this study and directions for future research, including a call for nuanced understandings of the contextual effect of resources, stressors, and outcomes, with attention to the variance between these factors.

3. Feminist Seminar: April 25, 2018 (Wed) 2-4pm; Room 240 (Soc Dept, 725 Spadina) (co-sponsored with Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration Workshop)

Author: Sohoon Lee (Postdoctoral Fellow, U of Toronto)

Title: Politics of informal bargaining: border and care labour in South Korea

Discussant: Fidan Elcioglu (U of Toronto)

Abstract. Although South Korea has no designated labour migration scheme for care work, migrant women comprise a substantial proportion of the country’s informal care workforce. Only a small fraction of the migrant care workers have their employment registered with the Ministry of Employment and Labor while the majority “prefer” finding their jobs through unofficial routes and working informally. This paper examines the meaning of public intervention in informal employment for migrant care workers by focusing on the politics of their labour. By comparing the stories of workers who are on temporary and long-term visas, the paper analyses what informality politics mean for migrant care workers who negotiate with their citizen-employers in the presence or the absence of the state.

Bio. Sohoon Lee is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Sociology, University of Toronto. Her postdoctoral research project explores the ‘informal’ politics between the migrant care workers and their employers in the liminal space of immigration, social protection and labour. Building upon her PhD thesis, she is currently working on a book manuscript on the temporality of ethno-kinship migration in South Korea through a combination of ethnography, in-depth personal and group interviews and analysis of laws and policies. Her research interests also include multicultural (damunhwa) policies in South Korea, return migrants and bottom-up development in Indonesia, and NGO-Trade Union relationship in migrant movement in South Korea. She has also undertaken consultancies with UN Women, Friedrich-Ebert- Stiftung (FES), and other NGOs to write on topics of migrant domestic workers, intersectionality and discrimination and labour rights protections in South Korea.